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National Geographer, Vol.L, No.1 + 2 (Jan-June, July-Dec. 2015), Pages 117-127

Cropping Intensity in Kushinagar

National Geographer, Vol.L, No.1 + 2 (Jan-June, July-Dec. 2015), Pages 117-127

Kaustubh N. Misra
Buddha Post Graduate College,
Kushinagar
 
Abstract
 
 
The study of cropping-intensity constitutes an important aspect of agricultural geography as it provides a good basis for agricultural based developmental regionalization. The crops are generally grown in combinations and it is rarely that a particular crop occupies a position of total isolation other crops in a given area unit at a given point of time. This study goes through to this direction. Change in cropping pattern is determined by factors like agro-climatic conditions, technological, infrastructural and institutional environment and profitability signals. As, it is generalized by the academicians that agriculture or primary activities are the sign of backwardness; but it is not true in India and in Indian villages based districts. In India, most of the livelihood depends on agriculture and agricultural products, ultimately on primary activities. Researchers think that agriculture sector is a sector of backwardness, so the regions comprehensively related to agriculture treated as backward areas; it is unfortunate part of academia. Kushinagar district in such a way treated as backward area. And so, Ministry of Panchayati Raj declares it as the 250th backward district among the 640 districts across the country. The backwardness of this district is not its agricultural base, but the behavior behaved with this district by the Government as well as the residents of the district. In this study, it has been examined the structure of cropping intensity and the impact of that on the developmental process of the district. For this purpose, primary data have been used and analyzed here in this research paper.
 
Introduction
 
THE single most important element in crop production strategy in the post-green revolution period is improved agricultural technology. This technology is in the form of high yielding plant varieties, intensive cultivation, and greater use of fertilizers, increased irrigation and better techniques for plough wing, harvesting and plant protection. The level of cropping intensity is determined by several factors. The most important factor is the availability of water from natural (rainfall) and or man-made sources (irrigation). However, the scope for year round cropping activities in most states of India is severely constrained by the seasonal distribution of rainfall. So long as this natural constraint is relaxed, by developing irrigation facilities, the level of multiple cropping will not improve. The flexibility in selecting appropriate crop pattern is also enhanced when irrigation facilities make water available in a controllable manner farm to the farmers throughout the year. It would, therefore, be reasonable to hypothesise that a greater part of inter-state, or irrigation facilities, both in qualitatively and quantitatively. In general the level of cropping intensity is higher in the regions with higher percentage of net sown area irrigated and with higher intensity of land use by irrigation (GIA /NIA). However it is futile to expect a one to one correspondence between irrigation and cropping intensity. The other crucial variable that determines the level of cropping intensity is the availability of labour. The characteristics of the farms according to holding size in India suggest that labour availability is an important determinant.