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Indian Journal of Social Research Vol.54 (3) (May - June, 2013) (187-192)

DEVELOPMENT OF PREBIOTIC ICE CREAM INCORPORATED WITH MALTODEXTRIN

C Pandiyan
Assistant Professor, Department of Dairy Science
Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal 637 002, Tamil Nadu

G Kumaresan
Associate Professor, Department of Dairy Science
Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal 637 002, Tamil Nadu

B Murugan
Associate Professor, Livestock Research Station
Kattupakkam, Kanchepuram 603 203, Tamil Nadu

G Rajarajan
Assistant Professor, TANUVAS Regional Research Centre
Pudukottai 622 004, Tamil Nadu

A Elango
Professor and Head, Department of Dairy Science
Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal 637 002, Tamil Nadu

S Gayathri
Post graduate student, Department of Dairy Science
Veterinary College and Research Institute, Namakkal 637 002, Tamil Nadu

Abstract

Ice cream was prepared by replacing butter with maltodextrin as a prebiotic substance with the objective of improving the functional property of ice cream. Ice cream was prepared by replacing butter at 3 different treatments viz., 4 (T1), 5 (T2) and 6 (T3) per cent levels keeping a control without incorporation of maltodextrin. A significant (P<0.05) difference in the fat percentage of the ice cream was observed between the control and treatments. The total solids content was not statistically significant between control and treatments. There was a (P<0.01) significant difference noticed in the standard plate count and coliform count showed no significant difference between control and treatments. All the samples showed a (P<0.01) significant difference for total sensory scores. The results suggest that the replacement of butter up to 4 per cent level with maltodextrin does not affect the sensory qualities of the ice cream; functional ice cream can be prepared by incorporating the prebiotic substance maltodextrin at 4 per cent level without affecting the sensory qualities of the ice cream.

Keywords: Ice cream, maltodextrin, physico chemical properties and sensory qualities

Introduction

A food can be said to be functional if it contains a component (which may or may not be a nutrient) that affects one or a limited number of functions in the body in a targeted way so as to have positive effects on health (Bellisle et al., 1998), or if it has a physiologic or psychological effect beyond the traditional nutritional effect. The demand for functional food is growing rapidly all over the world due to increased awareness of the consumer on the impact of food on health. The definition of a prebiotic as put forward by Gibson and Roberfroid (1995) is ‘a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and / or activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon and thus improves health’. The beneficial bacterial species that serve as a target for prebiotics have been almost exclusively bifidobacteria and lactobacilli (Bourlioux et al., 2003). Prebiotics act on the target bacteria that are already commensal to the large intestine. As a consequence, use of prebiotics is arguably a more practical and efficient way to manipulate the gut microflora than probiotics. To exhibit such effects, a prebiotic must neither be hydrolysed nor be absorbed in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract, and must be selective for one or a limited number of potentially beneficial bacteria residing in the colon (Collins and Gibson, 1999). Minimum dose of prebiotic is required to exert a reasonable prebiotic effect. It is unlikely to attain this level of intake through the normal consumption of foodstuffs. Maltodextrin is a sweet carbohydrate made from corn starch. The starch is cooked, and then acid and / or enzymes (a process similar to that used by the body to digest carbohydrates) are used to break the starch into smaller chains (3 - 20 chains). Hyvonen et al., (2003) found that polydextrose and maltodextrin when used as bodying agents in the fat-free ice cream significantly increase flavour release, melting rate, perceived fattiness and creaminess. Therefore, prebiotics are often deliberately incorporated into biscuits, confectionery, cereals, dairy products, drinks, infant formula and weaning foods (Nakakuki, 2003).

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