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Indian Journal of Social Research Vol.54 (5) (Sep - Oct, 2013) (513-520)

IMPACT ASSESSMENT OF FRONTLINE DEMONSTRATIONS ON GREEN GRAM (VIGNA RADIATA) IN BARAN DISTRICT OF RAJASTHAN

K C Meena
SMS, Ag. Extension, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Anta-Baran
Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
Udaipur (Rajasthan)

Subhash Aswal
SMS, Soil Science, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Anta-Baran
Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
Udaipur (Rajasthan)

Mahesh Kumar Shivhare
Senior Research Fellow, Krishi Vigyan Kendra, Anta-Baran
Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
Udaipur (Rajasthan)

Abstract

Frontline demonstration (FLD) is one of the most important and powerful tool for transfer of technology. Keeping in view of an effective extension approach of FLDs for dissemination of moong technology, an impact assessment of FLDs conducted by KVK, Anta-Baran was assessed. The impact assessment was based on the comparison of demonstrator and non- demonstrator respondents with reference to increase in knowledge level of demonstrator farmers and extent of adoption of improved green gram production technologies. The constraints in adoption greengram production technologies that perceived by the respondents was also measured. It was found that the level of knowledge of demonstrator farmers regarding different improved greengram production technologies was higher than non-demonstrator ranging from 3.66 MPS of time of sowing to 16.14 MPS of plant protection measures.  The difference in extent of adoption level between demonstrator and non- demonstrator farmers was ranging from MPS 1.33 to 26.67. The highest and significant difference was observed in adoption of soil treatment (MPS 26.67) followed by use of high yielding variety (MPS 26.44), seed treatment (MPS 25.71), plant protection measures (MPS 17.90), seed rate and spacing (MPS 15.49), fertilizer management (MPS 14.52) and weed management (MPS 11.49), respectively. The overall difference in extent of adoption level between demonstrator and non- demonstrator respondents was MPS 14.02 which was considered as significant. The study also revealed that  un-uniform of pod maturity that required more labour, high infestation of insect-pest and diseases, lack of yellow mosaic virus resistance variety, low income crop as compared to other regional crops, high weed competition to the crops, unavailability of high yielding variety, pod sprouting due to rain at the time of maturity and lack of knowledge and skills of greengram production technologies were important constraints in adoption of green gram production technology as perceived by both category of the respondents.

Key words: Frontline demonstration; Greengram production technology; Impact assessment; Knowledge; Adoption; Constraints.

Pulses in India have long been considered as the poor man’s only source of protein. Pulses are grown on 22-23 million hectares of area with an annual production of 13-15 million tonnes (mt). India accounts for 33% of the world area and 22% of the world production of pulses. Due to stagnant production, the net availability of pulses has come down from 60 gm/day/person in 1951 to 31 gm/day/person (Indian Council of Medical Research recommends 65 gm/day/capita) in 2008. Greengram or Moong (Vigna radiata) is a leguminous pulse crop, grown all over India. Many botanists agree that it originated in India, since its closely related species like Vigna radiata variety sunlobata grows wild in India and it has been grown in this region since prehistoric period. Green gram is cultivated in India, Burma, Ceylon, Pakistan, China, Fiji and Africa. In India, the important states growing this crop with a total area of about 30 lakh hectares are Orissa, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Bihar. Its grains are used as dal, soup and feed for animals and its straw is used as fodder and fuel.

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