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Indian Journal of Social Research Vol.56 (2) (Mar - Apr, 2015) (225-228)

CONSUMPTION PATTERN OF DIFFERENT EDIBLE OILS AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RELEVANCE OF DIET RELATED DISORDERS IN VIKAS NAGAR And ALIGANJ AREAS OF LUCKNOW

Sudeepti Ratan Srivastava
M.Sc.- Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, Isabella Thoburn College, Lucknow

Abstract

The present study was conducted in Lucknow city of Uttar Pradesh. The purpose of the study was to assess the consumption pattern of different edible oils and their association with prevalence of diet related disorders. One hundred female respondents belonging to middle income group comprised the sample of the study. Data was collected by using a self structured interview schedule. Data was analyzed in terms of frequency, percentage and chi-square (X2). The statistical analysis revealed that there exist significant relationship between reuse of oil and presence of disorders. It was found that reuse of oil has negative impact on the health with presence of disorders.

Introduction

Vegetable oils occupy a very important place in the human diet and frying is one of the most commonly used methods for cooking. Numerous epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have highlighted the biological importance of fats especially the saturated and polyunsaturated n-6 fats used for human consumption. Frying is a complex process, involving several reactions which affect the components of the fatty material used as a frying medium, both the triglycerides and the components of the unsaponifiable fraction (sterols, tocopherols, carotenes etc) (Dobarganes et al, 2000). When food is fried its nutritional content changes—the food loses water and takes up fat, increasing its energy density. Frying modifies both the foods and the frying medium because oils deteriorate during frying, especially when reused, through the processes of oxidation and hydrogenation, leading to a loss of unsaturated fats and an increase in trans fats (Pokorn, 2003). Thus fried food absorbs degradation products of the frying oil. During the process of frying, the oils and fats are heated to high temperatures at the same time they are exposed to the air, which results in a complex series of reactions that generate a wide spectrum of new components both volatile and non-volatile that may have important physiologic effects. From the nutritional view point, the non-volatile products of degradation are more important because they remain in oil, are absorbed by the food and are later consumed (Sanchez-Muniz et al, 1994). When oil is heated, it changes its chemical composition and creates substances called polymers and polar compounds which seem to raise blood pressure. Fried foods have been associated with various cardiovascular risk factors in cross sectional studies....

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