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Indian Journal of Social Research Vol.56 (4) (July - Aug, 2015) (577-586)

RELATIONSHIP OF VISUAL PERCEPTION AND WRITING READINESS WITH QUALITY HANDWRITING

Rupinder Kaur Grewal*, Deepika Vig**and Sarita Saini**
*M.Sc. Student and **Associate Professors
Department of Human Development
Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana - 141001, Punjab, India

Abstract

The present study aimed to explore the relationship of visual perception and writing readiness with handwriting. The total sample for the study comprised of 160 public school children studying in grade 3 and 4. Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices was administered to ascertain intellectual abilities of the children. They were further evenly distributed across the categories of good and poor writers (English language) viz. children with good handwriting (n=80) and poor handwriting (n=80) by administering set – a (handwriting test) and set – b (visual perception test) of occupational therapy screening test  by Lilley (2006). Later, on the same sample, self structured writing readiness assessment tool was administered. The results of the present study revealed the significant and crucial role of visual perception and writing readiness to develop the solid foundation for handwriting.

Key words: Good Handwriting, Poor Handwriting, Visual Perception, Writing Readiness.

Introduction

Writing is a tool for communication. It is both a skill as well as a means of self-expression. The complex process of writing integrates visual, motor and conceptual abilities and is a major medium through which children demonstrate their knowledge in academic subjects. The process of writing involves two main activities that combine to make it possible. One is the physical act of forming letters and words. The second activity is the creation of a text. Classroom instruction in handwriting usually begins at the kindergarten level and until approximately grade 3, instruction is given on the formation of letters, numbers and words. After grade 3 greater emphasis is placed on writing as a form of meaningful self expression. Therefore, a child by the age of 9-10 years should be ready to write legibly ‘(Karanth & Rozario 2003)’.

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